candlestick

October 1845-July 1846


The Collected Letters, Volume 20


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TC TO KARL AUGUST VARNHAGEN VON ENSE ; 13 November 1845; DOI: 10.1215/lt-18451113-TC-KAVE-01; CL 20: 55-56


TC TO KARL AUGUST VARNHAGEN VON ENSE

Chelsea, 13 Novr, 1845——

My Dear Sir,

Again accept many thanks for your kind Letter, for your kind punctuality in sending me that little Note of Monies, which completes our small Book-operation, and perfects your service to me in regard to it. Here is Bookseller Nutt's receipt for the amount; and so we conclude with the Scotch Wish on glad occasions, “May never worse be among us!”

Your commission for the Schiller Portraits was very easily executed. I have made the Bookseller send you Six, that you might have Two still on hand, since Four were already disposed of: they are put into a copy of the little Book itself, and are to leave London, by Nutt's Parcel, on Tuesday next, four days hence. I hope they will come all right; and be a momentary pleasure to your friends and you. I have not been able to see them myself; but Chapman the Bookseller is a punctual man. About the beginning of December he will send you, by the same conveyance, a copy of the Cromwell: a rather bungling Engraver is busy with a Portrait of the old Puritan Hero,—which I am somewhat afraid he will spoil. Our artists are, for most part, properly Mechanics; and excel, if at all, only in that latter department!—

We have Preuss's big Book in our library here,1 tho' not quite accessible at present: I design to consult it and others by and by. Archenholz is an old friend of mine; the first Book I ever read in German,—many years ago now!2— — By the way, would you on some good occasion send me a complete List of all your Writings. We have most of them here in our London Library, a favourite reading for all manner of intelligent men and women: but I think they are hardly all here, and we ought to have them all. Pray do not forget this.— I have lately been reading Bülow-Cummerow on Prussia:3 a somewhat commonplace, longwinded, watery man: out of whom, however, I glean some glimpses of Prussian Life, which are very strange to me. Almost the converse of ours: full of struggle, fully of energy and difficulty; so like and so unlike!

Our wanderings here are not yet concluded. The day after tomorrow we go down to the Sea-Coast in Hampshire, for a week or two of winter sunshine, and the sight of kind friends, in a climate much superior to London at this season. One of our gracious Hosts is the Lady to whom that Friedrich Book of Prints you sent us has gone.— I should have told you long since that my Wife made friendship with Miss Wynne, of whom we hope to see more in time coming.4

And so for the present, Farewell. I will wish strength and good-speed; courageous resistance to the Winter, and to all other enemies and obstacles, of which a man finds always enough! With true regard Yours always

T. Carlyle