candlestick

July 1847-March 1848


The Collected Letters, Volume 22


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JWC TO THOMAS CARLYLE ; 1 October 1847; DOI: 10.1215/lt-18471001-JWC-TC-01; CL 22: 103


JWC TO THOMAS CARLYLE

Addiscombe / Friday [1 October 1847]

Just two lines, Dear, before starting, in case I arrive, as is likely, with a head too bad for writing from Chelsea by today's post—

My visit here has gone off rather successfully in one sense; I never saw Lady Harriet in such spirits, so talkative and disposed to be talked to—I should have enjoyed being beside her more than usual, if I had not felt a need of exerting myself much beyond my strength; as she made a point of ignoring the fact that anything ailed me, I fancy it must be one of her notions about me that I am hypecondriacal and to be made well by being treated as tho there were not a doubt of it.1 Happily I have got thro' it without giving any trouble—but shall be glad to get home today where I may have a fire in my room when I am shivering, and a glass of wine when I am exhausted, and may go to bed when my head gets the better of me without feeling it to be “a secret to displease her”— Every day here I have had to slip into bed about two and lie with a dreadful headach till five when it went suddenly away—and when the housemaid not Eliza) she is in town) found that I lighted my bedroom fire myself, she carried away the coals! and no bell could bring her—and the room is so cold and damp now there is no sun. And then no dinner till six—and no wine but hock which makes me ill—and John had bad me take two glasses (no less) of Maidera—and in short “there is no place like home” for being sick in—and I should understand this once for all— —I am a little stronger however than I came—tho I have not had one good night—and I expect to feel the benefit of the change when I return— When I look at my white white face in the glass I wonder how anybody can believe I am fancying

Ever yours

J C

Poor Ladies of the Grange I can see them all quite distinctly Lady H says “how could she find time to write to you when she has had to read all these works2