candlestick

April 1849-December 1849


The Collected Letters, Volume 24


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TC TO JANET CARLYLE HANNING; 18 September 1849; DOI: 10.1215/lt-18490918-TC-JCHA-01; CL 24: 237-238


TC TO JANET CARLYLE HANNING

Scotsbrig, Tuesday Evg 18 Sep[tr] 1849

Dear Jenny,—My Mother wishes me to a1 write a word to you, to say how glad we all were to get your Note on Sunday with the assurance that you were got well again, the former news having somewhat alarmed our good Mother on that subject. All is well here, or in its usual state of health, my Mother especially brisk; harvest is going on rapidly in the bright weather,—five scythes going today, and hopes that the whole affair of cutting will be over about the end of the week. Some cows unfortunately are ill of the epidemic; and the potatoe-rot here is making rapid progress below ground as well as above. I am unable to tell you how the new dress fits, for indeed it has never yet been tried on; I can only say it looks well, and no doubt is entertained about its suiting.

I arrived here on Friday night about 10 o'clock having come with little delay at Edinr, direct from my Highland quarters; I am glad enough to be at complete rest here ever since. Jane, along with John, as you know, had gone the day before to Liverpool, whence we have repeatedly heard from them, all well: Jane is to be at home, if her purpose hold, this very evening about 11 o'clock; John reports himself as likely to return to Scotsbrig about

the end of this week, or beginning of next.— My own day of departure is not fixed yet; but it is to be soon: you shall hear farther when or before it takes place. My Mother has been speculating about another drive to Dumfries first: but I shudder at all “drives” or locomotions, or exertions of any kind; the Pony too is said to be rather in tired case;—I cannot promise to come, but should like if I could. Tell Jean I found her two excellent Kilmarnocks2 here; and accepted them with gratitude.— The Ecclefechan sheevers (or “lifters”),3 with whom this goes, are come in for supper, so I must end. With my regards to Assembly street, and my love to you all, Your affectionate Brother

T. Carlyle