candlestick

1854-June 1855


The Collected Letters, Volume 29


-----

TC TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES; 30 June 1855; DOI: 10.1215/lt-18550630-TC-EOT-01; CL 29: 346-347


TC TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES

[30 June? 1855]

Sir,— The following Document, and the proposal or appeal now grounded on it, require to be made known to the British Public; for which object we, as the course is, apply to the Editor of the Times. About two months ago there was presented to Lord Pn as Head of her My's Govt a Memorial, on behalf of a certain aged Miss Lowe and her Sister; which will sufficiently explain itself, and who the Miss Lowes are to those who read it here:

The undersigned beg resp &c &c (insert the Memorial,1 with the Signatures &c)——

Deanery St Pauls

To this Memorial his Lordship made answer, with great courtesy and witht undue delay, that the Fund set apart for——(t.o.)—that the fund set apart for encouraget of literature could not be meddled with for a Pension to the God-daughter of Johnson; but that in considern of the circs, his Lordship from some other fund made her a Donation of £100. Which sum has accordingly been paid to Miss Lowe: a very welcome Gift and Help: all that the Govt can do in this matter; and unfortunately only about the 3d part of what it is indispensable to get done.

An additional Annuity of at least £20: we find taking all things at their minimum, the case of these venerable old persons cannot & must not be dropt witht something equivalent to that.2

If the thing is half as English as we suppose it to be, a small pecuniary result of that kind is not doubtful when once the application is made. At all events as the English3 Govt is not able to do this thing, we are now bound to apprise the English Natn of it; and ask the English Nation in its miscellaneous Capacity, Are you able to do it?— Messrs Coutts Bankers will receive subscriptions from such as feel that this is a valid call upon English beneficence; and we have too much reverence for Samuel Johnson and for the prest genn of his countrymen to use any soliciting or ignoble pressure on the occasion. So as the requisite amount has come in, the subscription will cease: of which due notice will be given. We are Sir &c

T. Carlyle

Athenm 3 or 4 July

John Forster

Charles Dickens