candlestick

July-December 1855


The Collected Letters, Volume 30


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TC TO JEAN CARLYLE AITKEN ; 29 August 1855; DOI: 10.1215/lt-18550829-TC-JCA-01; CL 30: 51-52


TC TO JEAN CARLYLE AITKEN

Chelsea, 29 Augt, 1855—

Dear Jean,—I had a Letter yesterday from John, inclosing one of yours; very welcome to me, there being rather a dearth of news lately. He says your Doctor assures him, and his own judgement corroborates, there is no special cause for apprehension at all in your case;1 but naturally you are anxious, naturally we are all so, and wish you had your task well over. Keep up your heart; take every care of yourself: and let us hope, and not fear!—

I am rather getting round again from my Suffolk tumble; which has kept me, till two days ago, steadily below par, rather than above it, as the calculation was. I can settle to no work, however; but am clearing off old scores, of Letters &c; I cannot find the handle of my ugly mass of confusions again, or know yet where best to begin. Neuberg, most obliging of German (or Jewish) men, who copies and does everything for me this long while, has lent me his Horse (being himself absent): an excellent swift little animal, which has done me more good than all the College of Physicians could; I have had 3 or 4 long rides upon it, and hope to have about a dozen more. Further we are going out to Addiscombe tomorrow; where Jane, I think after starting matters fairly, will leave me, with my Horse and some Paper and Books for company: I calculate on getting some good there,—for it is one of the quietest, as well as nearly the beautifullest, of all Country places: nothing but a Housemaid and a Gardener in it just now. There I can stay, or even come and go, for a couple of weeks; and consider myself withal, which may be one real advantage. I wrote to Jack for this evening, when he is to arrive in Edinr; sails (if all be right tomorrow (Thursday) Evening. His tour is rather inviting,—at least to a man that can sleep,—for a 3 weeks of this weather.—Do not bother yourself writing to me, unless it is convenient in your weak state; I will let you know from time to time all the same. And God bless you, dear Sister, you and all your Household.— T. Carlyle