candlestick

July-December 1858


The Collected Letters, Volume 34


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JWC TO TC ; 10 July 1858; DOI: 10.1215/lt-18580710-JWC-TC-01; CL 34: 26-27


JWC TO TC

5 Cheyne Row Chelsea / Saturday [10 July 1858]

You said, I think, that, altho' letters did not reach you on sunday in the course of nature, you did sometimes get one by accident. Trusting to such happy accident, I write today; as otherwise you could not possibly hear till Tuesday and might find that long to wait; especially if Jane1 be no longer there to advise you to make yourself easy.

I wish however that in laying down your fears—by advice; you had not taken up displeasure instead— You might have been quite sure that I would not have willingly inflicted anxiety on you— and that there must be something else in it than neglect on my part either intentional or unintentional— It has not been pleasant or even easy for me to write since I took this cold; I have had much pain in my head—in my shoulders, my side, everywhere; besides that my spirits have been quite crushed down by having it so brought home to me; that even in summer, now, I am “fit for nothing.” Still, while writing to nobody else whatever, I have not failed to either write to you, or address something to you every day.

On Monday I wrote—on Tuesday I sent the Review and the newspaper2—on Wednesday I wrote (a long and I flattered myself pleasant letter, considering) on Thursday I sent Tourgeneff3—on Friday I wrote—and today (Saturday I am writing)—

What has become of the Wednesday letter, I have no notion. Charlotte went across to the Church-Street post office4 on purpose with it, about 2 o'clock. She is positive she put it in; and it is incredible that she shouldnt have put it in! It must have misgone at the other end, I think.—

I sent the 2d vol of Tourgeneff, because it was the one I had done with; having by mistake read the 2d first. It is the only book I have read since you went away!

Fairie is going to translate him;5 Plattnauer6 told me—but there is much between what Fairie is going to do and what he does! He (Fairie) called here in a cab, yesterday, to inquire for me—he was not let in—for I only see the people I am most intimate with—and only one or two in the day— Talking makes me as hoarse as a crow—besides wearing me out—

The best news I have to give is that I have now had two tolerable nights—and am coughing less today— It is wretched weather to get well in!—cold and windy with frequent splashes of rain.

Charlotte must take this now—when she has to go for yeast—

Yours ever

Jane W C 7