candlestick

January-October 1859


The Collected Letters, Volume 35


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TC TO JOHN A. CARLYLE ; 25 August 1859; DOI: 10.1215/lt-18590825-TC-JAC-01; CL 35: 181-182


TC TO JOHN A. CARLYLE

Auchtertool, 25 Augt, 1859—

My dear Brother,

I have not been prospering much since you saw me,—especially since yesterday afternoon, when I slept after dinner not wisely but too well,1 and had other adventures subsequent! However, I mean to take a new departure and course of procedure; and, in spite of larynxes and varicosities, to have exercise enough, come how it can! One of those bad nights hurts even these local concerns more than direct pressure might; a good sleep, when I can get one, is still medicine for the whole man. I am whole at heart, or think I am; I must not give in, at least not till the sorrowful Fritz is done. Jane, I do imagine, does better here than at Humbie; whh is a great compensatn, and may avail us both in the winter coming.

There were 14 new days Provender laid in for the Horse; within that time he and I must be off! I do not intend for Linlathen, notwithstanding Mr Erskine's Letter of today (friendliest of Letters), whh I inclose.

It appears there is a supreme Woollen Drapery Shop, “Paterson & Romanes,” somewhere on the Nth Bridge (?):2 if you happen to be passing tomorrow, and wd shew him that fraction of very worn cloth,—and ask him for a specimen or two, the nearest he cd come? In colour and in suppleness (fineness of wool), it wd suit perfectly for a dressing-gown and jacket,—whh I cd get constructed at The Gill as I pass, if material were ready. Don't mind it much at all, for it is intrinsically not importt:—but if you do call, you may ask also for a specimen or two of thick “winter-coat” stuff (dark-coloured, supple, these are the qualities),—you have seen me with an old massive pepper-and-salt article perhaps: I have tried that (just now) for a specimen, but cannot get one witht laming the worthy old coat.— On the whole, I fear you will do no good with this lefthanded “Drapery” commission: fling it aside altogether, till I come myself, if that seem the wisest to you!—— I still somehow hope you will not go on monday,3—nor (unmassgeblich [hopefully]) till Henry is gone elsewhither. Your affecte

T. Carlyle