candlestick

July 1847-March 1848


The Collected Letters, Volume 22


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TC TO JOHN FORSTER ; 31 January 1848; DOI: 10.1215/lt-18480131-TC-JF-01; CL 22: 237


TC TO JOHN FORSTER

Chelsea, 31 jany 1848

Dear Forster,—I came home last week,—driven by an ugly Cough and Cold, almost my only conquest in that expedition. My Wife never came at all; could not, for illness and the rigour of weather.— And so here we are; much recovered now, I especially almost well;—and very willing (after several days of a Silence as of Hades here) to see the face of an articulate-speaking friendly man! Of course we, that is both of us, or almost either of us,—are never from home as times go.

I am reading poor Sterling's Book, with a strange, almost preternatural feeling,—being dead he yet speaketh:1 ah me!

By a Newspaper this morning I find the Squire Controversy, “intensely interesting,” is still alive,—in spite of the “ingenious and able” &c of the Examiner. Well; who can help it? Squire, I suppose, will have to take his Cudgel, and break the back of an Editor or two: that will perhaps kill the Controversy!

Come and see us, dear Forster, the first charitable hour you have.

Yours ever truly /

T. Carlyle

I see Goldsmith advertised:2 right good luck to him!— N.B. We never got the Proofsheets back;—is the Book itself coming soon?—