candlestick

August 1857-June 1858


The Collected Letters, Volume 33


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TC TO JWC ; 28 August 1857; DOI: 10.1215/lt-18570828-TC-JWC-01; CL 33: 54-56


TC TO JWC

Chelsea, 28 Augt 1857 / (Friday, Upstairs today).

Dear Little Being,

I know I shall get a Letter tomorrow, and so am patient under none today, whh indeed I did not expect, knowing what you had to do, in the flurry of railway-trains &c &c. This is a word to keep your little fancy easy over the Sunday. “Home” now will soon be the word! I think every time I hear that Clock strike downstairs: “You will not need above another winding, my good fellow!” But do not hurry either: surely if you are getting the least benefit, take it all with you. I have heard nothing of sea-bathing farther; did you try it at all from Morningside? I think not. Are you to give it up then; or is there not still some chance for you. Me it always used to benefit quite sensibly and at once; but you, I think, were more precarious. Cold, you know, is the thing to be guarded against.— Most certainly you were wise to leave the “Art-treasures” resting on their own basis. I feel as if I could not go across the street to look at them, with such a sorrowful canaillery all barking about them at one's right and left. A fatallish Prince-Consort, this of ours, driven into the “Art” line for a career;—and thinking e.g. Marochetti an Artist!1—leave all that to its own bad fate.— — And observe, none of your “cheap trains” again!2 Take the best train that can be had for money or love; and come home to me, not poisoned by foul air and annoyances. If you cd only consent to divide the thing in two? But I suppose you wd have no chance to sleep on the intervening night:—so it wd be worse, not better.

The weather today has grown suddenly quite coldish; grey, gusty east-wind (after such a fiery calm as we had), and rain evidently copious and not far off. I tried down below this morning but any papers went at such a dancing rate, I fled in, especially when the sun disappeared. I am in a dreadful ashpit of Prussian genealogies &c; all the imps in Chaos giggling at me, “Can you pull that straight, my man? And you think it worth pulling straight?” New Proofs too whh I dare not look at (till once this thing be done, which refers to them):—heigho! I had got into bad sleep,—two nights of it; when I discovered this morning that, in fact, the potatoes, tho' mealy were not ripe! So I have ordered carrots; and there is mutton-scrag;—and Anne has been up to say, “Ready, Sir!”— — Courage; bear a hand; steady!

Yesterday Ld Goderich came to ride; Darwin was here; had brot me this Paper (whh I find far too thick, and not so kindly as what I had);—Dn is not going till next week. Godeh was cheerful good company; I myself stupid as an owl (owing recently to the potatoes, tho' I ate only 2): we saw a dismal Cremorne balloon take the ground near Wandsworth;3 it vanished among trees within few yards of us, one of the absurdest-looking hulks I ever saw,—amid loud laughter from G. and low do from self. I decidedly rather like this young Lord: I hope some good may come of him yet for his aflicted Country, more destitute than country ever was. Poor Mrs —4 (No 1 of Cheyne Row, Anti-Cock little Lady),—her Husband5 has been at death's-door this month past with “English cholera”;6—has now got the turn. I always forget to mention it. God bless you, Dearest. T. C.

Did you ever see or hear of such a Letter as Lord A.'s before! It is No 2 of the former you saw;7 close next to it.