candlestick

August 1857-June 1858


The Collected Letters, Volume 33


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TC TO JOSEPH NEUBERG ; 17 January 1858; DOI: 10.1215/lt-18580117-TC-JN-01; CL 33: 156-157


TC TO JOSEPH NEUBERG

The Grange, Alresford, Hants 17 jany, 1858—

Dear Neuberg,

There were two points I forgot to specify with the due distinctness in regard to the Grumkow-Nosti, and indeed one of them refers to our State-Paper Abstract generally;—namely the first of the two,

1°. That I have all along been under some apprehension lest this and the other English date might still have been left “o.s.”1 by you: I undertake (in one passage, some distance back) to print everything, “New Style2 unless the contrary be stated.” Pray keep a very sharp eye upon this.

2°. It would to tell3 the reader (if you know or can ascertain) that the Grumkow Letter “strong enough to break his back,”—i.e. whh Hotham presented to Frh Wm, is the actual Original so presented. I have specified accurately where it lies &c in the State Pr Office; but this particular I did not like to be too emphatic upon.

Most of the Grw Nosti Pieces are given without special reference; nor is such needed farther: but we shd be accurately certain as to the general locality of them;—pray examine also if I am right in my notion as to the manner of their having got into the State P.O., whh I try to indicate in a footnote on one occasion.4— On the whole I can only ask you to look once again (for the last time) with your best eyesight upon that sad matter; and do for it what human method and intelligence can, now on its first stepping forth from Chaos into Cosmos.

I arrived here, safe, riding on my Horse who had come in the railway with me, yesterday late in the afternoon. Nobody is here but Lord An himself with his Sister and Mother-in-law:5 the place is silent as Elysium, and today almost as beautiful (one of the finest january days I ever saw); a place full of mournful thoughts, whh it is not unprofitable (were there any choice in the matter) to leave to their course in one for a day or two.

I expect to be home about Wednesday, before whh day it is not likely the Printer will be fairly at finis with his Grw-Ni6 stuff;—on the Sunday following, as already said, we will hope to see you at Chelsea. I left my Wife still a Sufferer yesterday morning; and can hear nothing till the day after tomorrow. Yours always

T. Carlyle